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Training and everyday events.

Full blood work up

Bella's Recovering after operation

Our little Bella, grandmother and absolute sweetheart, is resting today in the front room after being spayed yesterday.
Huge cushions covered by soft throws seem to be her choice of where to snuggle up and sleep, ignoring the sofa and dog bed that we brought in for her.
We had noticed Bella had been quiet but with no other signs we put it down to depression from having to stay in whilst I am unable to walk the dogs. Pyometra did lay in the back of my mind though and because we had stopped breeding from Bella a couple of years ago there was no reason to hesitate, I booked her in to be spayed.
That op was planned for next thursday, however on wednesday late afternoon i noticed some muck from her rear end and with that I knew it was Pyometra.
She went to the vets in the eve, Bella had no temperature and looked fine but they confirmed and brought the operation forward to the next day, yesterday.
We agreed because of her age to have a full blood work-up done and to also give her fluids to help her deal with it all.
Thankfully Hetti was doing the op which pleased us greatly as we knew she would take care of our Bella and our Bella deserves all the loving care she receives as she has made us and many other families very happy by producing such cracking puppies. She has made our pack a solid happy one with no issues and warms our heart with her loving personality and her clever little tricks. She is an all round absolute star who at the moment is more than likely not feeling like a star, bless her :(
Still, plenty of cuddles and care will have her back on her feet in no time at all and we are so pleased we caught it at the start of the infection and not once it had gone rampant and that the pyometra was an 'open' and not closed type :)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Common signs of pyometra are:

- lethargy and depression
- drinking and urinating more than normal
- loss of appetite
- vomiting
- discharge from the vulva
What is Pyometra?
 
Pyometra is infection of the uterus (womb). The infection is most commonly caused by E. coli, which enter the uterus either due to a mild urinary infection, or from the normal bacterial  of the lower reproductive tract. Hormones also play a role, as the condition is most likely to occur within 4-6 weeks after the bitch has been in estrus (heat/season). It is most common in dogs aged over five years, and can also occur in cats.

Pyometra can be classified as open or closed. Closed means that the entrance to the uterus is closed, so pus and debris is accummulating in the uterus, causing it to massively swell. This is the most dangerous type, as the uterus is being stretched so much it may rupture, and other organs are being compressed. Open pyometras are cases where the infection is draining out through the vulva. This is less serious, as the uterus is not swelling up as pus can escape. This type is often noticed earlier, as you can see the discharge.

Pyometra is life-threatening as the infection may become so severe it is fatal, and in closed pyometras the uterus may rupture, causing severe bleeding and shock
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